Posts Tagged cabbage

Grillin’

Cooking and eating still happen chez Yusuke, just not much blogging.

Our stovetop was out of commission for a while, so a new grill/griddle was acquired.

Here are some action shots.

Yum.

Okonomyaki  Raw vegGrilled veg

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Okonomiyaki-lite

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This was sort of okonomiyaki-lite: just simple cabbage and much less batter than the standard.

For the batter:
5-6 tbsp flour
100-200 mL of water with a pinch of dashi
3 eggs
4 tbsp of okara with enough water to moisten (or crumbled firm tofu)

To make:

  1. Dump chopped cabbage in a bowl
  2. Add the okara and stir
  3. Add the flour and stir
  4. Add the water and stir
  5. Add beaten eggs and stir

When the consistency is even, pour everything in a frying pan and cook until lightly browned.

Since there wasn’t much batter, the whole mass was rather fragile. To flip it, Yusuke used a large plate: place the plate over the cabbage, hold it and flip the pan upside down to get the cabbage onto the plate, then slide it back in.

Garnish with green onions and okonomyaki fixings (mayo, okonomi sauce, bonito flakes).

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Cabbage + tsuyu wasabi

cabbage + egg

We had this alongside the cucumbers in my last post.

Steps:

  1. Shred cabbage (finely sliced)
  2. Dump in a big pan
  3. Stir fry for a while
  4. Break two eggs and pour over the cabbage, allowing them to sink in and sizzle
  5. Cook to desired level of egg firmness (or runniness) and brownness
  6. Put cabbage mass on a plate
  7. Mix tsuyu with a bit of wasabi and pour over cabbage

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Wafuu chahan

wafuu chahan

Yuuummmmm, these photos are making me drool. This post gets two for good measure.

I’ve labeled the dish わふうチャーハン, that is, Japanese style fried rice (wafuu chahan).

The first step was to soak dried hijiki, a wondrous thin seaweed, kindly sent to us by my mother-in-law in Japan. (I also love kombu, nori, and wakame, but I think hijiki is my favourite.)

Yusuke began the cooking stage by sauteing shredded cabbage and chopped okra with a bit of sesame oil.

He then added the now-soft drained hijiki to the sizzling pan.

After the veggies were cooked, he pushed them to the side of the pan and poured beaten eggs onto the hot surface. After the eggs stared to cook (like an omelette), he added hot pre-cooked rice and mixed everything together.

At the very end, he added some seasoning to taste:

  • sea salt
  • black pepper
  • dashi powder
  • soy sauce

So. Good.

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Wasa-cabba-cado

cabbage

That is, cabbage and avocado with wasabi. Ok, so the colour in the photo looks rather unfortunate. But this dish was FANTASTIC. Yusuke made it, of course, but I hope to replicate it sometime.

Yusuke began by sautéing garlic until the aroma was released.

He then added strips of cabbage and stir fried them with olive oil.

He then mixed in pieces of avocado (neatly scooped out with a spoon). While much of the pieces stayed in tact, the avocado added a lovely creaminess.

The main seasoning was わさびじょうゆ (wasabi-jouyu aka wasabi + soy sauce). He squeezed out about 3 cm of wasabi from the tube, mixed it with soy sauce, and poured it into the cabbage. He also sprinkled in a bit of sea salt.

One could also add lime or lemon juice if desired.

YUM.

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Tomato risotto

Drat, I seem to have lost my notes for this dish. It was a lovely Japanese-style risotto with tomatoes, leeks, and cabbage. Given the ingredients, I suspect that it was designed to target symptoms of a winter cold… It was most certainly delicious.

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Vegetable Fried Quinoa

This is a really old one. For the recipe, see http://blog.fatfreevegan.com/2008/02/vegetable-fried-quinoa.html

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