Posts Tagged sushi

Jun-i dinner

As a belated birthday treat for Yusuke, we indulged again at Jun-i, this time for dinner. I’m going to borrow a post from Yusuke’s blog for the occasion. To quote:

“Best Sushi in Montreal”

So many North American people misunderstand what “sushi” is. Especially, seeing restaurants selling sushi-ish stuff in North America really makes me sad… In addition, North Americans believe they are eating sushi, but they are not.

OK. This is the best place to taste “real” sushi or sashimi in Montreal. The restaurant is called “jun i.” Both taste and presentation are excellent.

モントリオールには日本食(or 寿司)っぽいレストランがたくさんあるけれども、あくまでも「ぽい」ので全く味はお話にならない。そもそも寿司を正しく理解していないのだから、無理もない。何件かモントリオールのレストランを試したが、今のところjun iが一番のお気に入り。味・盛りつけともすばらしい・・・。

Ikura

Ikura

To start, we chose the fabulous miso soup and kaiso salad—several types of seaweed with a shiso vinaigrette. We also had warm sake served in chic square glasses and a square pitcher. Not quite as smooth as the sake that I had in Japan, but it still had the intended effect. Next was the sashimi appetizer, with each piece accompanied by a different sauce. The salmon went with umeboshi (pickled plum) and maple syrup, the hamachi had ginger and yuzu, the scallop had green tea, etc. And then we had more sushi: ikura (salmon roe), kani maki (spicy crab rolls), unagi (eel), and salmon. I selected the unagi and ikura, both of which I had for the first time in Japan. Both were (nearly) as good at Jun-i. I love how the ikura bubbles explode into liquid in your mouth… For dessert, we picked the linguistically confused “ringo tartatin”: apples sautéed in cinnamon and ginger, served with foamy cream and a sable cookie. Yup. Splurge. More pictures from our last visit are here

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Chirashizushi

Chirashizushi

Chirashizushi

Chirashizushi is “scattered sushi”: the fish, vegetables, and whatnot are arranged over rice. In this instance, Yusuke combined shrimp, fresh salmon from our local poissonnerie, green onions, and a thin omelet cut into strips. Usually, the rice for this dish would be mixed with rice vinegar and sugar, but instead Yusuke used a “magic powder” that his mom sent—it’s called sushinoko. Yusuke’s mom also sent us the wonderful wooden bowl for serving the rice. The soup is traditional miso with tofu and wakame. This indeed is one of Yusuke’s restaurant-worthy creations!

Chirashizushi and soup

Chirashizushi and soup

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