Posts Tagged zucchini

Courgettes and aubergines

This domburi combines courgettes and aubergines (or zucchini and eggplants or なす と ズッキーニ, whichever you prefer).

First, Yusuke scored the skin of the eggplant, cut it into large pieces, and sautéed them in canola oil. After removing them from the pan, he set them on paper towels to remove some of the oil. Separately, he simmered white onions and cubed zucchini in a broth of water, dashi, soy sauce, mirin, and sake.

He assembled a domburi by serving the veggies over rice, adding a sprinkle of sesame seeds, minced ginger, and shichimi.

Zucchini factoids: summer squash was first cultivated in Mexico/Guatemala and taken to Europe by Christopher Columbus. Excellent source of magnesium and vitamin C.

Eggplant: first cultivated in China in the 5th century B.C. Good source of dietary fiber and potassium.

(To help with my search results: domburi is also transliterated as donburi. Easier: 丼 or どんぶり)

Comments off

Yaki-veggies

This meal was similar to the izakaya vegetables that I wrote about before, but the sauce was quite different this time.

Yusuke grilled okra, sliced zucchini, and whole crimini mushrooms directly on the rack of a hot oven (or rather on tin foil on the rack) since we don’t have a barbecue or griddle. He also toasted white onion slices in a dry frying pan, with the rings held together by toothpicks.

He wanted to use orange or apple juice as a yakitori sauce base, but we didn’t have any. Instead, he peeled and then grated apples and sautéed them in a sauce pan. He then added soy sauce, white wine, lemon juice, mirin, brown sugar (white sugar would also work), ginger and garlic. He simmered the entire mixture on the stove for 30 minutes or so.

To eat, we dipped the veggies into the sauce, adding in addition a sprinkle of shichimi and sesame seeds. Yusuke also added sesame oil to his bowl: an option according to personal preference, he says.

Comments off

Soupy tofu and veggies

tofu_veggies

There are endless variations to what one can do with fresh vegetables, good tofu, and a few stock ingredients. This is why my food life is so happy.

For this dish, Yusuke boiled firm tofu, carrots, zucchini, mushrooms, and bean sprouts in a big frying pan in a “soup” of some Japanese staples:

roughly 1-2 tbsp each…

  • soy sauce
  • water
  • rice vinegar
  • mirin
  • sake

a pinch…

  • dashi
  • sugar
  • salt

After everything was cooked, he lowered the heat and added katakuriko (Japanese potato starch) to thicken the sauce.

To serve, he removed the tofu from the pan so that it could form the bottom layer for the veggies.

(How sad I would be if I had never discovered tofu. I really, really want to visit at least one, and hopefully more, tofu restaurants during our upcoming visit to Japan. Yusuke went to a place called Junsei once in Kyoto and has never forgotten the experience. The restaurant’s site has posted an interesting video of the tofu-making process.)

Comments off

Octopus, zucchini, and tomatoes

Chopped tako

Chopped tako

Ah, octopus. A nice grocery store near us often has a decent array of fish, and lately they’ve had succulent-looking packages of thick octopus tentacles. So we bought some. And in the interest of typing efficiency, I will henceforth use the Japanese word for octopus: tako.

Sometimes less-than-fresh tako is awfully chewy or tough, but this wasn’t bad.

Tako salad

Tako salad

For this lovely salad-like stir-fry, Yusuke first chopped the tako and spread salt on the surface. Then he boiled it in salty water until tenderish and drained off the water.

Next, he sautéd minced garlic in olive oil until the aroma was released. Then he added de-seeded and chopped tomato and zucchini. After the veggies were nearly done, he added the tako. Last was a pinch of salt, and voilà! Done.

Yusuke described it as totally garlicy and “pretty much Italian.” I described it as yum.

Modified miso soup

Modified miso soup

We also had this miso soup, which was a little different from the norm. Instead of dashi, Yusuke used powdered chicken bouillon. The veggies are green pepper, carrots, and white onions. A bit of soy milk was added at the last second before serving.

Comments off

Rainbow trout and veggies

I wasn’t sure if this meal was really blog post worthy, but the food looked so pretty on our table that I wanted to take a picture.

Rainbow trout and veggies

Rainbow trout and veggies

The rainbow trout filets were simply baked in the oven under the broiler. We ate them seasoned with soy sauce and in my case, tons of ginger. Yusuke stir fried the zucchini and bean sprouts in a fair bit of oil (omega 3 goodness?) and we added a dash of soy sauce and wasabi when we ate them. The miso soup has carrots, potatoes, and white and green onions.

Bean sprouts & zucchini

Bean sprouts & zucchini

Miso soup

Miso soup

Comments off

Spanish omelette

Spanish omelette

Spanish omelette

And now for something completely different. Yusuke recently added a new European dish to his repertoire of staple meals: the Spanish omelette. He had had the dish in Japan, but I hadn’t never heard of it; I kept asking, “but what makes it ‘Spanish’?” But the intertubes informed me that tortilla espanola or tortilla de patata is a quintessential Spanish tapa. Yusuke first cooked the potatoes, then sautéed them with white onions and zucchini in our large wok-like pan. Then he poured in a mixture of several eggs and a bit of milk. He flipped it a couple times until the eggs were nicely browned. Yusuke added ketchup to his, while I opted to spice it up with Sriracha sauce.

Comments (1)

Shio-dare stir fry

Shio-dare stir fry

Shio-dare stir fry

Yusuke called this stir fry “shio-dare,” which means salt sauce. The ingredients are zucchini, mushrooms (yay!), bean sprouts, and pork tossed with sesame oil, salt, pepper, and a pinch of sugar. That’s all. Any further explication would be superfluous for this wonderfully simple dish. The soup was miso with abura-age.

Comments off

« Newer Posts · Older Posts »