Posts Tagged shrimp

Risotto

I’m tardy in posting this…we ate it a month ago as a beautiful Valentine’s Day treat. Yusuke followed a (Japanese) recipe but omitted the butter called for in the original. First, he sautéed uncooked white rice and chopped white onions in olive oil (2 tbsp?). After it was cooked, he added chicken broth, which was absorbed into the rice. Next came broccoli, carrots, and shrimp and last, everything was seasoned with salt and pepper. We had a bit of cheese in the freezer, leftover from my last quiche which Yusuke crumbled into his bowl (I passed).

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Okra and shrimp

Coincidentally, seasoned boiled okra was featured on Kanako’s Kitchen the day after Yusuke made a nearly identical dish. I guess that proves that it’s genuinely Japanese. Her description of the procedure is much better than I would write, so I refer you over there. Yusuke’s creation was the same (boiled okra topped with katsuoboshi), but he also added boiled shrimp.

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Shrimp and snow pea salad

A simple salad. The shrimp and snow peas were cooked in boiling water; the onions were raw (and spicy!). The dressing has: lime juice, mirin, rice vinegar, soy sauce, shichimi togarashi, and bonito flakes for garnish.

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Shrimp-veggies stir fry-stew

shrimps_vegs

I don’t remember the details of this dish, but I do recall that it was very tasty, so I didn’t want the photo to go to waste. It’s a sorta stir-fry, sorta stew. The body has soy sauce, sake…and the other usual stuff. The veggies, as you can see, are asparagus, bean sprouts, bok choy, carrots, and mushrooms, along with shrimp.

random_soup

And this is really more of a nice idea than a good photo: miso soup with asparagus and abura-age. Lovely.

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Tofu, broccoli, shrimp stir-fry

tofu-broccoli-shrimp

This was an especially lovely stir fry with a nice colour contrast of tofu, broccoli, and shrimp. Firm tofu was used here, as silken breaks apart too easily. The fresh broccoli was especially tasty; it’s much better than frozen despite the mess the florets tend to make. The stir fry seasoning was very simple:a few tbsps of chicken broth, potato starch (1 tbsp dissolved in 1 tbsp water), and salt & pepper to taste.

Comme d’habitude, we also had miso soup (with more tofu and green onions).

stir-fry_soup

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Random veggies and soba

Two soba meals. (I wrote more about soba here.)

Soba bowl

Soba bowl

The first bowl shows cold soba for summer. The sauce consists of dashi, mirin, salt, soy sauce, sake, and kombu (seaweed) broth. The toppings are green beans, wakame, shrimp, bean sprouts, and green onions. Fresh and crunchy. Chili flakes are sprinkled on top for extra spice.

I’m pretty sure that both of these meals had matcha soba, which are made with green tea mixed in with the buckwheat. Yum yum.

I tried my very best to make the proper slurping noises while eating my soba, but this is difficult when quiet eating is so ingrained.

Hot soba: eating in progress

Hot soba: eating in progress


And this is hot soba for the fall. The sauce is the same, but the toppings are shrimp, carrots, egg, white onions, green onions, and pork (for Yusuke).

Note: the ingredients always begin in a tidy arrangement on top of the noodles, but I took this picture after Yusuke had mixed it up and begun to dig in.

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Sesame stir fry

Sesame stir fry

Sesame stir fry

Another simple stir fry. Yusuke used sesame oil, garlic, ginger, and chicken bouillon (powder) for this mélange of napa (a type of Chinese cabbage), bok choy, carrots, and shrimp. Since sesame oil is so strong, the dish was very flavourful.

Napa tofu soup

Napa tofu soup

We also had this clear soup with the remainder of the napa, cubes of firm tofu, green onions, and chicken broth.

The picture also shows a glimpse of our new rice: gen-ji-mai brand brown rice. Yusuke found that this was much cheaper than our usual white rice, so he decided to give it a try. The grains are about the same size as white rice, though not quite as sticky when cooked. It is must less “grainy” in texture than I expected. And it’s healthy, too, at least according to the package… To be precise, brown rice has 64% more fibre, 286% more potassium, 582% more magnesium, 161% more vitamin B6, 1021% more vitamin E, and 400% more antioxidants than “ordinary milled white rice.” Impressive. But mostly, I think it tastes good. Recommended.

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