Posts Tagged asparagus

Magical soba

This dish was rather a nifty creation, in my opinion.

Yusuke’s first task was to boil fresh bean sprouts: just a few minutes to retain a crunchy texture.

Next, he halved cherry tomatoes, removed the seeds, and sautéed them in a dry frying pan (they had enough liquid alone).

He set the tomatoes aside and repeated the sautéing with asparagus spears, again in a dry pan.

After the veggies were done, he boiled soba in plain water for about 4 minutes. Longer leads to mushiness!

He arranged the drained noodles on a plate, topping the pile with neatly placed bean sprouts, tomatoes, asparagus, and sliced avocado.

In the centre went glorious natto, sans the mustard sauce that comes in the package.

Last, we drizzled soba sauce over everything, sprinkled a bit of shichimi (spicy seasoning) and mixed it all up—after taking a picture, of course. The soba sauce had its usual components: water, dashi, mirin, sake, soy sauce, and a tiny bit of sugar.

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Leek and potato pottage

This delightful pottage was inspired by a fantastic meal that we had in Ireland.

The recipe that Yusuke found to work from advised not using the green part of the leeks, but that would be a terrible waste!

First, he chopped up the leeks into tiny pieces. He separated out the white parts and sautéed them in a bit of butter until soft. (N.B. olive oil would also work.)

Next, he added a few splashes of white wine and let it simmer for a while.

After a few minutes, he added the green leeks and white potatoes that were cut into tiny cubes. In addition, he threw in:

  • chicken broth
  • sea salt
  • black pepper
  • five bay leaves (thyme would also work)
  • basil

He let everything simmer until the potatoes were soft.

Next, the pot went into the fridge until it was cool, and then the contents transferred to the blender.

Once smooth, the mixture went back on stove over low heat. 1/2 cup of soymilk was stirred in. Last, the soup was seasoned with salt and pepper.

Gorgeous.

We also enjoyed grilled asparagus with balsamic vinegar alongside the pottage.

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Tangy asparagus

Appetizing as an appetizer, or delightful as a main dish (as we enjoyed it).

Yusuke heated olive oil in a frying pan and then added minced garlic, which was sautéed until aromatic.

Next, the asparagus spears were added to the pan, along with sea salt, 2 tbsp of white wine, 1 tbsp of mayonnaise, and 1 tbsp of rice wine vinegar. Cook all. That’s it!

Ah, asparagus. You make me think of spring. March, please hurry up with the lion bit. This girl is ready for lamb weather.

NB: the mayonnaise was Japanese, which apparently is quite different from North American style. I’m rather anti-mayonnaise myself, so I don’t know the details, but I’m assured the difference is substantial. The main brand is kewpie. Visit the website for too much mayonnaise-related cuteness.

Kewpie mayonnaise by rachelkillsemo. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0

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Ume stir fry

A tangy and refreshing stir fry.

Yusuke used a bit of olive oil to cook up halved grape tomatoes, zucchini, asparagus, bean sprouts, and chicken (optional). He opted for olive rather than sesame oil for a lighter, fresher taste.

The sauce was based around two smashed umeboshi (pickled plums). It also included mirin, sake, soy sauce, dashi, and mirin.

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Moyashi domburi

A few weeks ago, Yusuke was positively salivating over pictures of food that one of his sisters had taken during a trip to Hokkaido. In particular, he really drooled over the various ramen dishes. Alas, we didn’t have any ramen on hand, but he made a substitute.

To start, he sautéed a tiny bit of spicy tobanjan sauce with sesame oil and then added asparagus, leeks, and bean sprouts. For additional seasoning, he added a tiny of bit of salt—to be precise—and 1 tbsp of soy sauce.

This mixture was dumped onto a healthy portion of rice.

Next came the broth spooned over all: made of soy sauce, water, black pepper, a tiny bit of sugar, and bonito powder. Last, strips of nori were arranged to garnish.

This is nothing like ramen at all, but for Yusuke it evoked the taste of shoyu (soy sauce) ramen and made him less jealous of his sister.

(To help with my search results: domburi is also transliterated as donburi. Easier: 丼 or どんぶり)

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Asparagus & mushrooms with garlic-onion-bean sprout sauce

asparagus and mushrooms with garlic-onion bean sprout sauce

A typical simple dish with unique flavours. Yusuke sautéed asparagus and mushrooms—each separately—in a dry pan. They could also be grilled or baked in a hot oven. He arranged them on big plates to serve. The sauce was quite interesting, composed of 1 tbsp lime juice (or lemon), 1/2 tbsp rice wine vinegar, 1/2 tbsp sesame oil, a bit salt and black pepper, and lots o’ minced garlic. Chopped raw green onions and boiled bean sprouts were also mixed into the sauce to make it crunchy. And that’s it!

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Shrimp and asparagus goodness

Omm nom nom shrimp.

First, Yusuke defrosted frozen shrimp and soaked them in a beaten eggs with a pinch of salt and pepper. The original recipe that inspired this meal called for egg whites only, as well as katakuriko to make the shrimp crispy when fried, but Yusuke said he was too lazy to do this. (He’s too hard on himself.)

Next, he sautéed sliced white onions and sliced asparagus in a frying pan. [Aside: It seems that it’s asparagus season somewhere: I keep finding beautiful specimens at the grocery store.]

Next into the pan went a healthy dollop of minced ginger and then a “soup” of 3.5-4 cups of chicken stock, a pinch each of sugar, black pepper, and sugar. Finally, he added the shrimp and cooked everything for a while longer. Finally, he reduced the heat and mixed in 1 tbsp of katakuriko.

We also had miso soup with eggplant and green onions. But I suck at photography.

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