Fish

We ate a lot of fish in Japan. I think we had some with nearly every meal, in fact. I don’t know how Yusuke can cope with that dietary change, since it’s a rare treat for us now. Here follows a few brief descriptions of some fish-related highlights.

Yusuke’s mom frequently baked, broiled, or fried a piece of fish, as seen below, as a part of breakfast, lunch, or dinner. Just add a dash of soy sauce and enjoy. Sashimi was also a normal part of food at home. I also recall having wonderful sashimi, including hamachi, tako (octopus), etc. at a posh restaurant in the Ginza district of Tokyo. No picture was taken, alas.

Random fish example

Random fish example

Yusuke’s dad brought home this wonderful seafood salad a few times. Absolutely beautiful to my eyes (and mouth), but just standard for their family. The white rings are squid, and it also had shrimp, clams, seaweed, etc.

Seafood salad

Seafood salad

We had our first sushi dinner of the trip on Christmas Eve. It was a nice restaurant, but not in any way exotic or out of the ordinary. The nigiri was fabulous. Our plates literally looked like a textbook explanation of sushi. No California, kamikaze, or rainbow rolls here, folks. We had negitoromaki (minced tuna and green onion rolls), salmon, maguro (tuna), ika (squid), ebi (sweet shrimp), hotate (scallop), tamago (egg), ikura (salmon roe), and hamachi (yellowfin tuna). And also anago (eel), which is, obviously, the long piece at the front of the picture. I had it for the first time here, coated with a sweetish barbecue-like sauce. Surprisingly tender and exceedingly delicious.

Sushi

Sushi

Ooh la la

Ooh la la

Yusuke’s aunt and uncle treated us to a wonderful Japanese dinner at restaurant one evening, and several of the dishes included fish. (I’ll write about some of the non-fishy offerings another time.)

Tuna with tororo-imo

Tuna with tororo-imo

This dish above is yamakake, which is the combination of maguro (tuna) and tororo. Tororo is essentially nagaimo or yamaimo which has been ground up. Did you follow that? In other the words, the white stuff is a root vegetable that becomes extremely sticky and, well, slimy, when it’s grated or ground. It might be unappealing to some Westerners because of the stickiness. Here it was mixed with an egg, increasingly the sliminess factor. I liked the combination with the maguro, though it’s wise to keep rice nearby when eating it.

Poor Mr. Fish

Poor Mr. Fish

This poor li’l fella was still twitching on our table. But he sure was tasty. In case you’re wondering, we did not eat the chrysanthemum.

Maguro salad

Maguro salad

This salad had cucumbers, white and green onions, chrysanthemum petals, and maguro with a slightly vinegary dressing. Again, note the deep red colour of the tuna. It’s rare (ha, ha) to see fish of that hue here in North America.

Advertisements

2 Comments

  1. […] liked the combination with the maguro, though it’s wise to keep rice nearby when eating it. (Original post) Possibly related posts: (automatically generated)Hot springs eggs and […]

  2. […] tororo. It can also be eaten with things like tuna (check out a description mid-way down this page) or […]

RSS feed for comments on this post

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: