Mushrooms

Being part hobbit (though sans hairy feet), one of my most loved foods is mushrooms. And I got to experience many delicious varieties of the fungal delicacy in Japan.

My mother-in-law knows of my particular predilection for mushrooms and prepared a tasty mélange of enoki (long, thin mushrooms), white button mushrooms, and shitake for our arrival.

Baked mushrooms

Baked mushrooms

A couple times, too, she prepared thick, flavourful shitake by grilling them in her oven’s special fish broiler slot.

Shitake

Shitake

Another shitake treat was a simple stir fry with green onions (the stalks of which are about five times larger in Japan than in North America).

Shitake stir fry

Shitake stir fry

On several occasions, I got to have nametake—Yusuke usually describes them as “slippery mushrooms”— which are very difficult to find in North America. They are often served in miso soup, but in this dish, they were served over mashed daikon. Mushrooms of various types, especially nametake, were included in the cuisine of the mountain area of Hakone.

Nametake

Nametake

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1 Comment

  1. uinen said

    Yusuke reminded me that we also had shimeji a few times, particularly in the wonderful nabe (hot pot) dishes we had a fancy restaurant and at a friend’s house. We didn’t take any pictures of them, but they are small mushrooms with long stems that grow (and are sometimes eaten) in clumps.

    We also had maitake, a leafy type of mushroom, but I can’t remember where.

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