Archive for October, 2008

Garlic sprouts stir fry

Garlic sprouts stir fry

Garlic sprouts stir fry

This stir fry of chicken, carrots, and garlic sprouts was a bit different from Yusuke’s “standard” ingredients. The sauce is primarily miso, mixed with sake, soy sauce, and sugar. I had never tasted garlic sprouts before Yusuke made this recipe for the first time. We can only buy them at our neighbourhood Korean grocery (also our rice supplier).

I should clarify that in doing “research” for this post, I found that “garlic scapes” or “stems” or “tops” are more common terms. I’m not sure where Yusuke got the word “sprouts,” since it doesn’t seem to be too common. Perhaps a slight mistranslation. Anyway, they’re the fabulously bright green long thingies that grows out garlic bulbs. And they are aromatic, making them extremely tasty in stir fries. But perhaps not the best meal to have before, say, a job interview, or a meeting with the queen.

I can’t quite recall the specifics of the miso soup… Suffice to say, it was good.

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Avocado

Avocado

Avocado

This is another meal to file under “simple food tastes so good.” The picture appears to be apples, but in fact those are avocados. We just dip the slices in a mixture of soy sauce and wasabi and eat them with rice, topped with thin slices of nori. Avocado is very filling, so we just had soup to go with it: miso with wakame and tofu. It doesn’t get much easier than this. And it goes without saying that this “fast food” is infinitely better than chez McDo or PFK.

(N.B. Wiki-links are provided to prevent any seaweed confusion.)

Avocado

Avocado

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Spicy eggplant

Spicy eggplant

Spicy eggplant

I can never pick a single favourite food (I’m fickle!), but eggplant would certainly have a prominent place on any top 10 list. Thus, I’m always a happy girl when Yusuke makes spicy eggplant. If I’m not mistaken, first he puts salt on the raw eggplant slices or soaks them in water. Then he cooks the eggplant at a low temperature with oil to make it tender. Then he adds other ingredients to the stir fry, in this case, carrots and pork. The sauce is similar to what I’ve described before: garlic, ginger, tobanjan (Chinese chili bean paste), and soy sauce, with potato starch to thicken it. This iteration was delightfully sweat-inducingly spicy. I think Yusuke prefers to remove the skin from the eggplant, but I really like to eat the skin (even if it has pesticides or whatever)—that’s where most of the vitamins are, anyway.

The soup was mushrooms, green onions, and egg.

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Quiche

quiche

quiche

quiche and lentil soup

quiche and lentil soup

Quiche is one the staple “things-I-can-make-successfully” in my repertoire. This one came out a little odd, but still tastier than I expected. (The oddness was due to the fact that I under-filled the pie with the eggs and milk, rather than over-filling like I usually do.) The vegetables were baby spinach, mushrooms, and green onions. I used soy milk instead of regular milk, which gives the quiche a sweeter taste. I used mozzarella cheese, which again has a milder taste than Swiss (which I use sometimes). I seasoned the egg mixture with black pepper, salt, a tiny bit of mixed Italian herbs, and a pinch of nutmeg. All-in-all, it wasn’t bad, but not nearly as good as Mom’s quiche.

The lentil soup was also nearly instant, as I used a can of diced tomatoes. First, I cooked white onions in a bit of rice liquor, then I added the tomatoes, chopped carrots, lentils, a couple bay leaves, and salt and pepper. Before eating it, we added a splash of red wine vinegar to each bowl, per Jen’s suggestion.

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